PLANT OF THE WEEK

If you haven’t added Weigela to your landscape, we have to wonder ‘Why Not?’ One of our favorites is Minuet Weigela. Both the foliage and flowers will add a lovely splash of color to your spring garden. The incredible display of rosy-pink blooms against a backdrop of purple-tinged foliage mixes fantastically in a shrub border, but it also works well anywhere else as a colorful garden accent. 

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PLANT OF THE WEEK

This week we’ve chosen the Regal Empress Clematis. Every mailbox, every fence post, every porch rail deserves a splash of color and drama. This prolific, compact climber offers large, double flowers in shades of pink over a long season. It’s important to add beautiful vertical interest to any garden fence or trellis. A great choice for a container or left to ramble through shrub beds. This clematis variety enjoys life in full or partial sunlight. It enjoys a nice drink at least once a week, but if it’s super hot you might want to give it a little more refreshment. This climber can reach heights of 4 to 6 feet and can span 2 to 3 feet, but it will need some support. It has an especially long bloom season and blooms in both spring and fall. If you love the style of cottage gardening, then this vine is the perfect choice for you.

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PLANT OF THE WEEK

This week we’re celebrating the Dream Catcher Flowering Cherry. This tree is categorized by its Large, single, clear pink flowers that cover its upright branches that expose dark green foliage. Fall brings orange-red to purple foliage color. A choice for a specimen tree for small yards, group plantings or as a street tree. It can grow up to 25′ tall and 15′ wide. Easy to care for, the birds love to hang out in this beautiful tree. 

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Plant of the Week

Since this is our FIRST “Plant of the Week” post, I selected an early spring bloomer to get you into gardening mode. The Show Off Forsythia is a new compact selection that gives a stunning display compared to some of the older forsythia varieties. Its early spring blooms fill its branches with bright yellow color in early spring. It has lovely dark green foliage that provides visual interest all season long. Planted as a short hedge or in mixed borders or even as a foundation plant, it produces blooms that work well as a cut flower.  

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Does Your Home Have a Welcoming Look?

When someone walks or drives past your home, does its exterior make them pause and want to visit or does it make them gasp and want to keep on going?  Stand in the street in front of your house.  If it wasn’t your home, how would you feel about walking up to the front door?  Perhaps it’s time to make some changes to your landscape. There are numerous ways to make your home more inviting.  How can you improve your front yard?  Does it involve your door?  Your porch?  The overall landscape?  With a little thought, your home can invite people to stop in, with or without the welcome sign.  

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What’s New In 2018?

One of the my favorite things every year is finding out what new varieties of plants will be showing up at my favorite nurseries. Of course, I have those favorites that I return to again and again, but being the first in the neighborhood to display a new annual or perennial always brings me a bit of joy. I’ve already discovered a few new plants this year that will certainly find a spot in my garden.

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Landscaping for Privacy

Neighbors on top of you?  An adjacent eyesore?  The buzz of a busy street?  Yes, these are the things that can keep you out of your yard, and out of what could be your own retreat and possibly the best part of your home.  There are many ways to create that private space, to camouflage ugly and to bring more welcome sounds to your yard.  The first step is to determine the main problem, the second is to come up with a plan, and then you need to implement the plan. There are several ways to add privacy to your landscape. 

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Hello February!

The February checklist for your yard. *Starts your seeds for the cool season vegetables & flowers. *Check your plants and tress for damage. During the cold months, animals can damage your plants when trying to escape the cold. *It’s a good time to start looking for pots and planters. Some stores still have last year’s merchandise to get rid of, and the bargains can be strong. *Cut back your liriope and other perennials now. It will get them ready to grow in the spring. *Prune your dormant trees and shrubs, but leave those spring bloomers alone. *It’s a good time to plant those larger B&B bushes and trees. *Give your holly bushes a hard prune this time of year.

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Choosing Color for Your Landscape

Landscaping is an artistic endeavor. It’s important to apply design elements the way an artist does when choosing a color palette for their next painting. Every color and shade awakens a specific feeling, and applying these properly will tie your landscape together and create a visionary masterpiece. You can choose your color palette based on your favorite colors, and by understanding the principles of the color wheel. Some colors are warm, others cool. Each color has a certain identity and performs differently in the landscape. Red. Excitement, intensity, passion, vitality, drama and energy. If you are trying to make an area feel tighter, rather than spread out then red is a good choice. Because it is a warm color, it needs to be in a bright space. Reds do not stand out in shady areas. It’s a great color for a focal point, such as a doorway or the dining area of your patio or deck. The complimentary color for red is green.  Good examples of red blooms include geraniums, petunias, celosia and dahlias.

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