Hydrangeas Virginia Beach

PLANT OF THE DAY – SEASIDE SERENADE CRYSTAL COVE HYDRANGEA

With every new lacecap I discover, I fall more deeply in love. Lacecaps are definitely one of my favorite summer bloomers, and this one has captured my heart. The blooms on this plant have a frilly detail that’s not on all lacecaps. They are edged with a deep purple-blue when grown in acidic soils, or a deep pink when grown in neutral or alkaline soils. And because it’s a reblooming variety it will bloom through the summer. As the flowers age, their color will deepen.

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PLANT OF THE DAY – SHADOWLAND HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL HOSTA

If you’re looking to add a new hosta variety to your landscape this season, let this be THE one! With it’s heart-shaped, blue leaves with a crisp white margin, the color and shape are certainly inviting. But toss in some incredible ruffling on the leaves and you’ve got a bounty of added interest in this selcetion.

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PLANT OF THE DAY – GOLD COLLECTION® CINNAMON SNOW HELLEBORE

Don’t you deserve a little extra color during the coldest months of the year? Hellebore is your answer. Also known as Lenten Rose, these beautiful treasures will bring you a bit of happiness in your landscape. Whether peeking out of the snow or located in a large pot by your doorway, you can count on Hellebore to fill the flower void. Cinnamon Snow is a particularly beautiful variety with it’s pink buds that will open up into large, creamy white flowers with the shades of rose and cinnamon. The color of these plants is affected by both temperature and the age of the flower itself, which means you can get quite a range of hues.

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PLANT OF THE DAY – MOJAVE JEWELS RUBY SEDUM

Dense clusters of blood-red flowers contrast dramatically against deep-purple, almost black foliage, to make a big statement in the garden. Unlike many sedum, this one is a bit shorter and much sturdier. It’s perfect for an a water wise area, rock garden, or container. Succulent foliage will die back to the ground in areas experiencing a colder winter, but will re-emerge again in the spring.

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